Marcus Hollingshead & The Marcus Device

American Antigravity was founded in 2002 with a vision to promote antigravity and zero-point energy research. We cover antigravity, energy, and emerging science to help make the dream of space a reality. View all posts →

Great Britain’s hottest gravity-researcher, Marcus Hollingshead, joins us for an interview about “The Marcus Device” — an up and coming gravity-modification claim that describes many of the same effects as the Searl Effect Generator, and yet stands alone as being a completely new approach to warping time-space.

Marcus is undoubtedly one of the most-controversial characters in gravity-research in the 21st century. His claims about modifying gravity are astounding – the ability to manipulate tons of weight, create repulsive force-fields, and violate conservation of energy are some of the many ideas that both captivate and compel people driven by the tale of his invention.

Marcus emerged in late 2002 posting at first on a local BBC messageboard — his posts being at first inquisitive in nature, and asking about some of the basic properties of matter relating to gravity. It later emerged that Marcus was in fact working in the area of gravity-modification research, and had built several prototypes of a gravitational-field generator based on his personal interpretation of the workings of Telluric (Earth) currents.

The “Marcus Device” as it came to be called exhibited what Marcus claimed to be a collection of effects similar to the Searl Effect Generator, including shielding effects, the bending of light and associated “black fog” during operation, and a reported massive Antigravity-Effect that Marcus claimed could eventually be tuned to lift tons of weight.

Marcus claims were so profound in nature & his presentation so believable that it created a frenzy around the inventor that ultimately led him to withdraw from public view. Thus, his commentary in this rare interview is the only occassion in which he speaks on the public record about the claims for his continuing research.